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20121027
20121104
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KNTV (NBC) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there are enough companies that have tripped that this is not just a specific company environment. as you hinted, geography does matter. companies primarily domestic, u.s. oriented tend to be having better earnings reports than those that have signicant businesses outside of the u.s. >> here we are a few days away from the presidential election. what impact do you expect the election to have on the economy and the markets? what would a romney presidency mean versus an obama re-election? >> i think we have to start by saying that it is so close that uncertainty is killing everyone. i have read articles about gee what happens if we don't know the next morning. it will mean neither candidate has a mandate. we need more compromise and we will have more loggerheads and more polarization. i wish it could be different. >> that's the issue. we haven't seen the two sides get together. they are unable to compromise. we have the fiscal cliff looming. why would it be better in terms of compromising and getting things done? >> so the optimist in me says, okay if it is mitt romney he was a republican governor
. >> reporter: you think dangerous environment? >> very dangerous. there is people with needles, there is people that come in there with knives, guns. it is not an environment for children. >> reporter: maybe that's why they wouldn't let us film inside. for some, there are strains of hurricane katrina and the desperate scenes in the superdome. for others here who are homeless before, this is at least something and they're grateful for that. >> i had a blanket last night. i had a meal last night. i had everything i needed last night. >> that was richard engel reporting. when we come back, it was the storm after the storm, why the city decided to cancel the new york city marathon for the first time in its history. jack! come on, stop the car. jack! no, no, no, no, no! the only thing more surprising than finding the perfect gifts.. niice. ...is where you find them. how did you know? i had a little help. this is how to gift. this is sears. you ari can't see. ooh, turn up the brightness. it's already up oh, oh, ooh, sorry buddy, you know some of us destroy zombies and some of us feed em. how am i sup
to infection or something harmful in the environment. so researchers hope the young stem cells banked when patients were newborns will be able to change the way their nervous system functions. cord blood registry in san bruno is the largest umbilical cord blood bank in the world. and now it's at the forefront of the first fda clinical trial of its kind, investigating whether the stem cells in cord blood may be able to cure autism. >> this initial pilot study will accept 30 children between the ages of 2 and 7 to have a confirmed diagnosis of autism that is not known to be caused by a genetic factor. >> reporter: those children will receive infusions of their own stem cells banked when they were newborns and stored with the registry. by ewing their own stem cells, their bodies can't reject them. dr. michael ches is running the fda-approved trial. the hope is the stem cells participants receive will be used to regulate their immune systems and stimulate neurological repair. >> the premise is that autism may be caused by a faulty immune system or potentially faulty nervous system, and umbilic
was in that environment? >> when i first saw it, no. because i still didn't really understand 1965 greenwood. i didn't realize the jeopardy he was putting himself in. >> but that was about to change. in a matter of weeks, yvette johnson and ray de felitta were on their way to mississippi with a film crew in tow. both were about to have a rendezvous with history. >> i developed a very strong desire to know my grandfather, to sort of find him to find his spirit, his essence. >> we realized if that's the journey in putting my father's movies out there for people to see the history out there all came together. we said let's go toll the story. >>> coming up, what would they find next? >> things happened we never foresaw. >> when "finding booker's place" continues. [ rob ] we weren't always the most adventurous couple. once we kept the lights on. but then we started using k-y yours & mine. yeah, we were nervous to try it. there's an amazing sensation for her. amazing. this one feels fantastic for me. and combined... ohh, it's a completely new sensation for us both. it's opened a whole new door for us. i'v
at school is essential for parent's peace of mind and laws are set up to promote that environment. >> but some school districts are overlooking one federal law that is supposed to be protecting students. jenna joins us. >> reporter: the law is title nine. it's not just -- it requires schools have a clear system in place for victims to file a complaint. but some bay area educators are not complying and others unaware of title nine. schools that get federal dollars must have a title nine coordinator to handle sexual harassment complaints. so we decided to test the system, using a standard e-mail address we sent this message to more than 200 principles across 25 districts in the bay area, asking how to contact the title nine coordinator. we even pointed out this person handles sexual harassment complaints. we contacted 35 principles in the district, and none could name the title nine coordinator. >> i believe they didn't know what you were talking about. >> reporter: we showed her how some of the principals responded. i have no idea what title nine is. sorry. and, i need to know who
environment it's good to get distracted and do something. >> how about doing your job? >> your boss is gonna love this. there is an idea, a concept. hurry up, got to go. >> this is a really fun one, it has a spa-like effect, make your own luminary, balloons filled with water. you dip it into a pot of hot wax over time. look what you get. >> that's cool. really cool. finally, something that saves the segment. good. >> thank you, danny. >> we love him. he's a sweetheart. congratulations on your tenth book, buddy. hope your house is okay when you get home, too. sara is back with a tour of some of new york's most hauntest haunts. >> wait until you see what she scares up. >> first this is "today" on nbc. >>> time for sara in the city, this time, a spirited trip downtown. >> hundreds of year, rumored sightings of ghosts around new york city. we wanted to see for ourself, so we sent sara. >> lucky me. that's right. from a haunted house to a wine cellar full of spirits. there's a laundry list of spots in this city that are said to be inhabited by another force, and i got to check some of them out. m
can control your environment a bit when you've had rest. nobody has slept. no one has had any rest the last four days, or five now. even if you weren't damaged in the storm, you've been out helping your neighbors. every bone sort of aches. >> some people aren't able to sleep because of what's going on and that makes they're them more stressed. but when you're stressed, it can be difficult to sleep. because that's when you worry. time to go to sleep, suddenly every little thing comes into your head. you start worrying about it and that makes it tough to sleep. >> you have to break the cycle. we have a lot of negativity right now based on the reality that people have lost everything. some people have. >> people have. >> somebody has to break the cycle, family, support group, a friend has to step in and say let's talk about this. it's not just about the loss, but it's about the rebuilding. how do we start putting our lives back together again, so you go out of victim mode, which is totally understandable. >> but you can't stay there. >> now being much more of a victim. >> i met a fami
, close the budget deficit. make, create a regulatory environment that encourages investment and certainty. that those are improving the situation. governor romney is also, however, correct that there's a long way to go. and that there are lots of people in ohio and elsewhere around this country who are unemployed or underemployed and we have huge progress. and 2% gdp growth is nothing to crow about. in fact it's less growth than in 2011 and less than 2010. >> all the economic news is about republican policies and all the bad economic news is because of democratic policies? it's funny, it's just disingenuous. >> how much of this is a problem in terms of how people feel, rachel. we see more economic optimism in the country and yet people are still feeling like the obama record is lackluster and you look at the recovery still not feeling like it's robust enough. >> and you see it just in the raw consumer confidence numbers. you see consumer confidence trending up and the unemployment rate trending down and you see the deficit dropping year to year. you see things going in the right direction
of the water and environment plan. an estimated $8 million plan of action for restoring the stunning valley. here are the arguments being made. >> this has been studied serve times in the last 25 years. we do not need another study. it's not viable. it's not feasible. this is a complete waste of money. >> those seven studies concluded that san francisco does not need to store its water on a national park, but san francisco essentially boycotted those studies. so who's telling the truth? the san francisco supervisor or the author of measure f. they're both taking liberties with the information at hand. here are the seven studies conducted in the last 25 years, performed by state and federal governments and advocacy groups and universities. now let's take a look at the most recent ones. a 2005 restore hetchhetchy study identifies the river as the bay area's primary water source and notes that pruchling water from nearby cherry lake to a tributary can replace most of what's lost from hetchhetchy. other option include expanding the reservoir farther downstream or calvaveras reservoir in the bay
politics, environment, national security. in endorsing obama today, mayor bloomberg mentioned climate change. and as i said to the governor, it's already new amsterdam. could the city be the new new amsterdam? >> i think it's important to start thinking about infrastructure as essential national security. for the last ten years plus, the united states has had a main national security priority, the thing we've spent the most money on, a trillion-plus dollars, that's been bringing democracy to iraq and afghanistan, with very questionable results. people i've spoken to, experts in the field say, we would be a lot safer, not just richer, if he had spent a lot of that money on improving infrastructure. that is not to say that counterterrorism isn't important. it certainly is. but they're related because the stronger your society is, the more protected you are also from a terrorist attack. >> may have to keep you around to cover this for a while. richard engel, thanks. good to see you. this disaster has been a great equalizer. if you're living in a place where the water rises, the power goe
detail what he called the toxic environment at goldman, one that encouraged taking advantage of its clients. his book is now in stores. greg, good morning. thanks for coming on. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in the book, you frame the leadership of goldman sachs as having made a choice between profit and reputation. when did they make that swing? >> as your viewers will know, earlier in the decade, there were a lot of things that were deregulated like complicated derivatives. it got to the point where banks saw they could make more money using their client information to bet for themselves as opposed to facilitating for a client business. ultimately by the time i left for firm, three quarters of the money was being made in the training business, as opposed to the original reason for wall street, which is helping companies raise money and merging. it's been a real revenue shift and also a behavior shift where taking advantage of clients has become the norm. >> what you write about are ethics issues, not really legal issues, per se. >> that's the great irony of the crisis.
in detroit, the soul of the school, andrews has created a loving environment not just for her students but also for their babies. >> last year she was in the infant room, now she's in the junior toddler room. everything they teach the kids in there is great. >> one of four high schools in the u.s. designated exclusively for high school mothers. with 220 students, the academy, which caters to pregnant teens and teen moms wasn't always like this. 26 years ago, principal andrews housed babies in a crib in her office. >> it was a little program that was hidden, nobody knew about it. >> reporter: as the demand increased, andrews saw the importance of creating an environment supportive of teen moms, but also gave their babies a head start. >> what do the moms get coming to this school they wouldn't get in another school? >> they get a staff that is focused on them. that is not mad about them being pregnant or parenting, who celebrate the fact that even though they're pregnant and parenting, they're still in school and they're participating in making a life for themselves, giving themselves s
create this kind of an environment then the child's memory is impacted with this and it makes them less cared going forward. >> gayle brings up a good point once the storm is past that's the scary part. that's where the wind and rain makes the house creak. if you're trapped indoors and have no power that's something else the kids need to under. >> let your kids know you'll be there for them. we're all together. this is a special time, something we'll always remember. you'll tell your kids about it. make it fun. >> call the neighbors. make it a community effort. >> actually if you go out anticipate help in the community afterwards with the clean up that also gives kids a wonderful feeling of having power, having ability to help and everybody feels good. that's a wonderful thing to do. >> gayle you said earlier families retook this as a family and sometimes parents don't understand the stress that even they are feeling. >> yes. >> so they are worried about their kids but they don't stop to take care of their own anxiety. >> like the airplane put our own oxygen mask on first. that's so imp
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)